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Saint Christopher and the Christ Child  Jan  Mandyn

Saint Christopher and the Christ Child Jan Mandyn

 

Two days were spent sailing over the Sea.

With each hour Fred’s respect

and love for It grew.

 

Power could be found in the sea creatures,

in the Sea’s waves. The currents carried

cool water toward the warm.

Where the currents met,

the sea creatures mated

and multiplied.

 

Food was abundant for the little ones.

Over the years they grew to the size that fit them best.

The crustacean was a tough meal and was

for the most part avoided. The flounder

lay motionless and could not be seen.

The clawless lobsters traveling,

all in a line along the bottom,

were very vulnerable.

 

Predators had their fill and quickly moved on,

allowing the remainder to multiply.

This fate was the opposite

of the Morays.

 

Each one took up a cave until all caves were filled.

Then each cave-less eel remaining was vulnerable;

thus limiting their numbers as they were

devoured by others.

 

The lion fish was so ugly that no other one chose to mate with him; and this limited his numbers.

“O you beautiful and cyclic Sea. The truth lay at Your depths, hidden from man’s eyes. Each of Your creatures multiplies, increasing its existence asymptotically. But wait! If that were true then the Sea would be full. The water would spill over It’s dunes and inundate the land.”

Thus spoke Fred in his own confusion.

 

Tomorrow: “On Safety in Numbers”