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Peter the Venerable, known for his (internal) Christian Charity and also known as the “Benevolent Abbot” was the first to acknowledge Innocent II as Pope. Peter’s generous attitude was opposite that of Innocent III who disregarded Peter’s lighter point of view.

 

Pope Innocent III

 

If Peter could have heard the words of Rudyard Kipling – – –

If you can hear the truth you’ve spoken, twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, or watch the things you gave your life to broken

– – -Peter may have wept. Did Peter realize the Christian military forces that would be drawn together as the result of his three tracts? Could he have imagined the death and destruction of his own Christians as well as Jews and Muslims that would result from those tracts?

As Cowdrey [English Historical Review, September 2003] states in his review of Iogna-Prat’s book “Order and Exclusion; – – -“

 “{Peter’s writings} undoubtedly tended strongly in this {militant} direction; yet one may hesitate to make excessively sweeping statements.

Iogna-Prat himself points out that Peter the Venerable was the pre-history of the medieval struggle against heresy in which the Pontificate of Innocent III was the turning point.”

The joining of politics and religion – – – then basted with the lubricant of royal riches – – – appear to have been not only the beginning of this twisted power but also its own final downfall. Separation of church and state still remain in the forefront of people’s minds. Secularism is the capstone of French thinking, even to this day, as a result of this Religio/Politico combination.

 

Tomorrow: Exodus

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