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Camping on Henderson Lake is one of the last places where we can enjoy peace, quiet and a respite from the city crowd that is invading our North Woods.

Henderson lake

Camping on Henderson Lake is one of the last places where we can enjoy peace, quiet and a respite from the city crowd that is invading our North Woods.

Henderson Lake is as clear as a bell. It is also the headwater for the Hudson River. In this place it is such a small amount of water. As the Hudson River flows to where the Boreas River meets it I hardly dare cross. I have been told that the Hudson is even larger when it gets to Albany and then New York City. I have no desire to see that. I like the water while it still rests in Henderson Lake.

Mr. Henderson was in charge of the Iron Mine here when it first opened up. He was a great fellow and one of the few that ensured that his workers were treated with respect. It was too bad that he had that accident over on Calamity Pond. He accidentally shot himself and died. We always seem to lose the good men of the Adirondacks. That was back in 1845.

Nature is now recapturing the iron mine and the blast furnace.

Overgrown blast furnace

All of that, the iron mine, the blast furnace, Henderson Lake, Calamity Pond, the birth of the Hudson River, all of that lies in the territory of my mother. She was Abenaki Indian and named me after the land of her people; Tahauwas.

So I am now Anglicized and have been given a first name, Thomas, thanks to a priest who wandered through here. I will always be known in these woods simply as “Tahauwas.” No one ever addresses me as Thomas.

But the city people have bastardized my namesake. They spell my mother’s territory as Tahawus, Tahowas, and The Howus Territory.

And so I camp here on Henderson Lake quite often; sometimes with a friend or two. We often get up into the high mountains and fish the streams for brook trout. They are still plentiful up there and probably will be for hundreds of years.

We still see the lynx and the fisher sometimes. Old Phelps shot a wolf up there recently.

I do not suspect that the city folk will want to wander in those high peaks.

God is saving the mountains for us.

Tahawas and Tomosky c

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