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His father owned coal mines in Pennsylvania. Barclay was often assigned to accompany a load of coal as it was shipped to the Philadelphia area. Most of the coal was used to fire an iron furnace.

 

Barclay was mesmerized and never forgot the site of white hot iron flowing out of the fire. To him it looked like a funeral pyre. After he died he decided to live near a furnace like that. He found his home between the headwaters of the Hudson River and The Opalescent Brook.

The house had been abandoned for quite a long time.

abandoned-mining-town-tahawus

 

 

It was in a deserted and deteriorating mining town with its very own blast furnace.

 

Barclay haunted from sundown to sunrise and never bothered a real live human being; until Vice President Bullmoose Theodore Roosevelt showed up. Then dire things started occurring.

 

The first was when Leon Czolgolz shot President McKinley.

mckinley-shot

 

 

And then Vice President Roosevelt had to take a hurried stage coach to Aiden Lair. He was on his way to Buffalo, New York to be sworn in as President of the United States of America.

 

No one seems to remember if Epinetus Wheelwright fixed any wheels for Roosevelt’s coach at Aiden Lair. That sort of makes sense because nobody ever saw Wheelwright fix anything.

 

In any event Barclay now had a great place to haunt and he could visit his funeral pyre blast furnace at “Tahawus in the Adirondacks” anytime he wished to.

iron-furnace

 

 

 

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